Mwasuze Mutya (‘Good Morning’ Plural Form)

27 02 2010

In the month since I have arrived in Uganda, this is all I have really learned how to say. I find myself speaking Spanish more to my colleagues Greg & Paloma whenever I can. I guess I have been lazy to start Luganda lessons. I have a great translator who goes out with me to the villages and most people have a working knowledge of English so I haven’t been motivated to start… yet.

One of the things I have come to appreciate about Uganda is the friendliness of most people. There are several children who wave and say hello to me every afternoon as I round the last corner on the hill before my house. The boda boda drivers are always friendly to me… because they want my business. The lady that I buy breakfast from every morning is very nice and asks how the food was the day before. And then there are the many people who want to sell me anything from electric fly swatters (looks like a toy tennis racquet but highly effective to zap the mosquitos at night) to sugar canes.

So it makes me want to be friendly back each time. I get the curious smiles and children following me especially when I go to the villages. Who can blame them, they don’t really see a Chinese American very often. Last Sunday was a great example. I spoke at a church in one of the villages called Takijunge and as we pulled up to the church, two little girls with beautiful braids and their shy smiles stood at the door waiting for us. I had just bought some chapatti (kind of like tortillas) for breakfast and asked if they would like some. I handed one to each of the girls and the response was so Ugandan. Many of the children and women in the villages will bow down to you out of respect when greeting you or receiving something. So these precious children bowed down to receive the chapatti, smiled and slowly ate them. Honestly, the first time this happened to me I was like “no, no please get up!” but since that time I have learned that it is how they show respect to you.

This type of greeting has been frequent especially when we have been doing our case intakes. After our legal educations where we teach the community about how to protect their rights, we invite those participants who may have been victims of property grabbing to stay and talk with us. The first legal ed I conducted, we had over twenty women patiently wait to talk with our staff. Every time they greeted one of my colleagues, they bent down and bowed in respect. I really want to figure out some way to honor them back. You see, these women are the courageous ones. I look forward to talking to these women because their faces light up when we teach them what the law says about property rights. They feel empowered and a sense of hope. As they wait to talk to one of us, I can only imagine what they’re thinking. Perhaps they have been a victim of property grabbing and this is their last option before sleeping on the streets. Or they haven’t had a meal in a few days and came to the legal ed because someone invited them. Whatever the case, I am beginning to understand a little more when Jesus said that he had compassion on the multitudes because they had been with him for several days and had nothing to eat. I think my favorite moments so far in the legal education have been watching my colleagues minister to the women who come for legal advice. Sometimes we are able to take on their case, other times we are not and we have to refer them to one of our legal aid partners. But everytime we hope to treat these women with the same respect that they greet us with. Some believe in God, others don’t. But we want to close each conversation with them by praying. We pray for hope, we pray for the opportunity for their land to be restored, we pray for peace and we pray for many other things. So while it is a case intake situation, it is so much more. It is a counseling session, it is a time of encouragement, it is the hopes that International Justice Mission can bring relief to a victim and secure justice for them.

Below are a few pictures of our legal educations.

Kaye (my translator) and I polling the participants to see what they know about Ugandan law

Here’s a great picture taken by our communications fellow Laura. Pictured from L – R are Jesse Rudy (aka my boss), Pastor Diana and myself. Pastor Diana helped me mobilize this recent legal education and was instrumental in inviting many community leaders. I love her heart for her community and desire to advocate for the rights of widows and orphans.